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Leeks, White Wine and Mussels

30 Jul

 

I happened to be at the Ballina Fisherman’s Coop recently when I spied this rather brilliant product. Kinkawooka Shellfish distribute 1 kg live, cleaned, scrubbed and de-bearded mussels in a bag that retail for around $15/kg. The product is fresh, tasty and easy to use. So, as usual, I jumped before I looked. I acquired some without even considering what I might actually do with them. Nevertheless, I wiped something up that fit the bill.

Leeks, White Wine and Mussels

[ Serves: 4 | Time: 60 Minutes | Cost: $18 ]
[ Joes Rating: 3 / 5 | My Rating: 3.5 / 5 ]

Ingredients

1 kg farmed mussels, cleaned and de-bearded
1.5 cups white wine
1 leek, sliced thinly
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped coarsely
1 tablespoon butter
drizzle olive oil
Wholemeal pasta to serve
salt and pepper to taste

The packaging for Kinkawooka Shellfish’s live mussels.

Method

  1. In a deep sided pan, sauté the leek in a little olive oil. When fragrant, add the garlic and stir well.
  2. Add the wine to the pan and reduce the heat to medium. Add the mussels and stir once. Place the lid over the pan and sauté for 8 minutes.
  3. Discard any mussels that have not opened. Stir the butter and parsley through the sauce and over the mussels. Season to taste.
  4. Serve hot with pasta and crusty bread.

Remove any that don’t open; they were dead and may be tainted. All mine opened; a testament to their freshness!

Observations

  • I loved this product; there is nothing like fresh produce to remind you of the simple things in life. Even though they were cleaned, I did pick over them and notice that they were a few with tiny beards still in place.
  • Joe and Brittany both loved the sauce and pasta but hated the mussels. Neither are seafood fans so guess what? More for me!
  • Diabetic Note: There is nothing bad here. I have opted to avoid using cream in this dish but I did use the butter as a lower fat content substitute. Nevertheless, there is only a tiny amount so the only real carbohydrates in the dish comes from the pasta you serve it with. I used wholemeal fettucine.
  •   And best of all, my Australian Sustainable Seafood Guide doesn’t recognise farmed mussels as being an unsustainable harvest and give it the green tick. Its one of very few seafood items that does get a green tick.

Mussels for me! With some berry ice tea. So yum!

 

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6 responses to “Leeks, White Wine and Mussels

  1. Genevieve Martin

    July 30, 2012 at 9:41 am

    Moules Marinieres…”Seamen’s Mussels”…a traditional French dish, and you have got it spot on! I love them, but those Kinkawooka Shellfish sound fantastic, I haven’t seen them up here but I am going to look for them!!! Thanks for the tip :).

     
    • Rhianna

      July 30, 2012 at 4:08 pm

      Hi Genevieve.

      Thanks for the compliment. It was really very tasty, although lost on Joe and Brittany I am afraid. It was my variation on the French classic – leeks. Who doesn’t love leeks!?!

      The mussels were sensational. Such a brilliant product. Might be worth while contacting the manufacturer and see where your local stockists are. It was definitely worth the effort.

       
      • Genevieve Martin

        August 4, 2012 at 9:28 am

        I actually emailed the supplier through their website, and have not received a reply :(. Disappointing.

         
      • genevievefoodie

        August 4, 2012 at 9:46 am

        And yes leeks are great with mussels, that’s always my preference too 🙂

         
  2. narf77

    August 1, 2012 at 8:48 pm

    I remember eating mussels by the bucketload as a child living in a seaside town in Western Australia. They were no-where near as upmarket as your wonderful recipe however. If I wasn’t a card carrying vegan I would certainly consider these little babies as part of Serendipity Farms repertoire…only thing is…Steve is in Joe and Brittany’s camp when it comes to anything bivalved so as they say in Brooklyn… “forgedaboudit!” 😉

     

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