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Sago, Coconut Cream and Banana

07 Aug

Sago

Oh sago… Where have you been all my life? Seriously a simple, delicious dessert that everyone will love. Sago is made from the starchy pulp of a specific type of palm tree. Yup, starch. That makes sago about 90% carbohydrates, so be careful, diabetics.

[ Serves: 4 | Time: 60 Minutes | Cost: $4 ]
[ Joes Rating: 4.5 / 5 | My Rating: 5 / 5 ]

Ingredients

100 g dry sago
400 ml coconut cream
½ teaspoon stevia or 2 teaspoons sugar
2 tablespoons coconut, shredded and toasted
2 tablespoons almonds, chopped and toasted

Method

  1. Put the stevia, sago and coconut cream in a pot and cook over a moderate heat for 5 minutes, stirring continually.
  2. Remove from the heat and place in the fridge until chilled.
  3. Serve with toasted nuts and coconut.

Yum, give me extra nuts and coconut!

Observations

  • I adore sago. No, I mean I REALLY adore it. I could eat it all day long. It’s so easy and so delicious. Ahh sago……. *drool*
  • Diabetic Note: Banana is always bad for me. When it comes into the equation, my blood glucose levels get crazy. Having said that though, my bloods handled this dish exceptionally well.
  • Ethical Note: I want to do some research about sago. I am not sure how sustainable the crop is. Many south-east Asian rainforests are torn down to make way for crops such as palm sugar. For now, the jury is out until I can find the time to research this further.

 

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12 responses to “Sago, Coconut Cream and Banana

  1. Come November

    August 7, 2012 at 5:31 pm

    My momma makes something like this for us all the time. try it with a side of ripe sweet mango! Yum!

     
    • Rhianna

      August 7, 2012 at 10:05 pm

      That sounds awesome too! I just adore coconut and sago =)

       
  2. narf77

    August 7, 2012 at 10:14 pm

    If you are worried about it not being sustainable (which it probably isn’t as it takes about 10 years for the sago palm to reach the age to harvest…) try using tapioca. Bigger but still sago like and quite delicious in its own right and the tapioca plant is mature at 1 year of age and is totally sustainable. I love both forms of frog spawn 😉

     
    • Rhianna

      August 7, 2012 at 10:15 pm

      tapioca seems higher in carbohydrates than sago which is why I went that route. I need to find time to do more research on that front!

       
      • narf77

        August 8, 2012 at 7:30 am

        I have noticed that tapioca seems to be the new latest greatest non dairy addition. They use it to thicken and give mouth feel to non dairy cheeses as they are now putting in a solid effort to make them taste and act like cheese including fermenting them as well and inoculating them for authenticity! The tapioca flour is amazing stuff and you can make all sorts of things out of it. I watched an old episode of the cook and the chef not so long back and Simon made home made prawn crackers out of it! Very interesting and it certainly opens up a whole lot of ideas. I have been saving my left over pulp from making my almond milk and drying it out in Brunhilda’s coolest warming oven and making almond flour. I wonder if that could be used in place of flour in some recipes? As of yet it is sitting (growing exponentially) in a jar in my cupboard. After soaking the almonds and allowing them a day to do so, the flour has taken on a malty flavour and scent. Interesting! I love doing food experiments 🙂

         
        • Rhianna

          August 8, 2012 at 9:08 am

          That does sound exciting! Will you do a guest blog for me on how you make your almond milk?

          I make polenta chips with tapioca flour. They are really delicious! You can see the recipe here http://rhithinkingfood.com/?p=967

          Tapioca flour is also awesome for tempura style batters as its light and silky to give it that greater crunch. Just make sure you use ice water for crispy results.

           
        • narf77

          August 9, 2012 at 6:53 am

          I just found a wonderful post on making chips out of chickpea flour! They looked really yummy and the person who made them hasn’t stopped using them in her photos so they must be good ;). I would love to guest post Rhianna if you ever wanted me to. I make a few different kinds of non dairy milks and now that I have found the right combination for my tea I have been able to go completely vegan again. I will be talking at next years Tamar NRM Sustainable Food seminar about lowering food costs, food miles and your carbon footprint by minimising reliance on supermarkets and growing your own with a little aside into vegan living. I have a few delicious cakes and some wonderful vegan “cheeses” to share with the audience so that they can see that being a vegan isn’t anything like most people think it is. Thats a great tip about using Tapioca for tempura! Cheers for that as I have been learning a lot about alternative flours and what they can be used for and Tapioca appears to be very multi talented when it comes to its uses. I love polenta chips and one of the best meals of my life was a mothers day where my sister and I took my mother out to a high end restaurant and I had wild mushroom ragu served over some heavenly garlic studded polenta…I can still remember just how good that was! 🙂 Food memories last forever…

           
    • Rhianna

      August 7, 2012 at 11:05 pm

      Fran, I have a bit of a favour to ask. Can you email me at rhianna@rhithinkingfood.com pls

       
      • narf77

        August 8, 2012 at 7:31 am

        Just sent you an email…let me know how I can help 🙂

         
  3. Three Well Beings

    August 7, 2012 at 10:57 pm

    I am so interested in this recipe, Rhianna! I have a Sago Palm! I have never heard of it as an ingredient. 🙂 I like to share photos from my garden, so one of these times I will post a photo and link to your wonderful recipe! I’m very curious about this now! 🙂 Debra

     
    • Rhianna

      August 7, 2012 at 11:00 pm

      Hi Debra!

      The inner pulp is harvested and processed somehow. I have no idea on the actual mechanics of it other than what is on wikipedia (which isn’t always the most reliable resource). Its awfully tasty though, Debra, and you should give it a try. Did you ever make the coconut custard?

       
    • Rhianna

      August 7, 2012 at 11:05 pm

      Actually, Debra, I have a bit of a favour to ask. Can you email me at rhianna@rhithinkingfood.com pls

       

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